So Much Knitting!

27 Jan

I have been commissioned to knit up 7 pairs of Bronco colored wrist warmers. I am currently halfway through the last pair!!! When all is said and done, I will have spent close to 55 hours on these gloves in just over 2 weeks, over 2 skeins of yarn, and I’ll be happy not to knit wrist warmers for a while. =OP
My fingers ache, my head is in a whirl, but I have had a chance to finish a few amazing audiobooks! Got through the last 2 Maze Runner books and found them quite thrilling, though at times I got angry at Thomas. Won’t spoil much for you guys in case you haven’t read it, but it’s called trust for a reason. Other than that, it’s the only issue I really had with the story line. One of my co-workers said he didn’t care for the series about halfway through the second book. I loved it. Though the last book could have done without most of the last few chapters (the Rat Man really started pissing me off), I did not find myself losing interest. In my opinion, it was better than the Divergent series (I couldn’t even finish the last book), which makes it immediately good.
Started on The Night Circus by Erin Morgenstein, read by the charming, handsome and brilliant Jim Dale. I’ve read reviews saying the book is slow moving and kind of boring; the characters aren’t easy to fall into. I have found it quite the opposite. The story isn’t slow. Descriptive? Maybe a little, but I challenge anyone to call anything descriptive after they’ve read The Gormenghast series…The Night Circus is perfectly descriptive meaning it tickles your senses enough to make you feel like you’re there. The story takes place in the latter part of the 1800’s, and mostly centers around the circus which is glorious, mysterious and wonderful. I am especially enthralled with the clock that keeps time using almost everything. Magic is the next level to the story. A duel is the next. I haven’t read enough of the story to grasp the full concept of what both characters are going to do, but I’ve read enough to say I can easily like both sides. It rushes through their adolescence, harboring now on the characters being in their late teens and their involvement in the circus. There are plenty of interesting characters that also fill up most of the pages. All of it is a story I keep going back to excitedly perched to hear the rest. Maybe it’s because I love Jim Dale’s narration; finding his voice comforting and the characters he plays realistic, or Jim Dale in entirety making this story one of the best I’ve read in a while. Whatever it is, highly recommended and I do agree with a bunch of other reviews liking it to a dream.

My thoughts and prayers are with those on the north east part of our country these next couple of days, but wherever you are, I hope this update finds you well, safe and happy!

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Selling Products

12 Dec

I’ve been reading online how to price handmade items and each time I finish an article, I am floored, if not more defeated than before I started.
I fully agree with taking in all cost of the product when considering a final price, and as such, adding a few bucks extra as an incentive, but all this doubling to wholesale, then doubling to retail stuff can be one heck of a struggle! Maybe this would work if you expect to sell things full time and are an accomplished crafter; your name is out there, it’s your only paycheck, Ellen Is raving about it and calling you up. When it comes to reality, however, this information can ruin a promising business, on small talk terms.

Take for example, my lightbulb ornaments I have seemed to make into a tradition around this time of year. Following the rules of the things I’ve found online, I’d have to sell each ornament for $50-70 to make a profit. WHAT?!!? No, no, no. Even someone not in this business can purely see that is not the case here. I am in no ways an accomplished artist, and even if I was, if I had to spend that much money on a simple lightbulb with some paint slapped on it to make a cheery looking snowman, I’d turn right around and walk out without a purchase.
True, hard work does go into it, but it’s a given with any handmade gift. Even simple little earrings, or a small doodle shouldn’t go for more than someone is willing to pay for it.
When I started selling my knitted hand warmers in a consignment shop, I decided on a price of $25. It’s a modest price for an item that only cost me less than $10 to make, and from that single skein of yarn, I could make 2 and a half pairs of them. Using the foundations I have come across, that price would be too low. Let me explain:
The yarn I was using cost roughly $8. I could make two sets of gloves, so it would come out to $4.00/pair. $2 for a new set of knitting needles would bring it up to $6.00. Now they’re telling me that I should make my labor costs around $10/hour. It takes approximately 4 hours to make a pair, so that would be $40 in labor. Total cost so far is $46. Now I would have to double that to come to my wholesale price…$92. Now I’d have to double that again to come to my retail price…$182.00.

One pair of handmade knitted warmers would cost you, as my buyer, $182.00 if you were buying from me.

That’s quite absurd. Even using the formula I found on another site, the retail price of a pair of my gloves should be $101.00.

If that’s the case, I better have made my gloves out of the hair of a unicorn from the mountains of Tibet!

As such, I just wanted to share my way of pricing items that I hope would give others in this romp of decisions a way to ease their mind. Using my lightbulb ornaments, I shall explain to you my pricing scale.
I utilize the dollar store. It’s a crafters best friend. I can buy a 3 pack of lightbulbs for $1. That’s .33 cents each, and what I will base my price off of. A packet of ornament hooks for a dollar, we’ll say about 10 to a pack. .10 cents each. We’re up to .43 cents. Glue sticks are a pack of 20, .05 cents each, and I can make about 5 ornaments with one stick: .44 cents.
Each ornament takes about 4 hours to make. With labor charges, I’d already be pushing $40 here, so I’m going to drop it down to $3/hour. Total cost so far? $4.44. Paint I already have on hand, but all of the product I bought together cost about $15. I’ll just say I use about .05 cents of paint for each ornament: $4.49. Paintbrushes I already have, so that’s free for me. New ones for this kind of project can be found at a dollar store: $5.49.

That’s all I have to consider for my material/labor cost. $5.49. Now to get my wholesale cost, I’ll double that to a nice even $12.00. For a little extra profit, I’m rounding it up to $15.00/ornament. That’s doubling my price for one ornament! Because of the product, I’ll still have enough paint and other supplies to last for dozens of ornaments more. If I sell all 3 lightbulbs, I’d have made $45.00. Minus $3 to replenish my lightbulbs, that’s $42.00. That’s a hefty $36 profit.

Now, this is only taking the lightbulbs into consideration. I do use this way of pricing for everything else I do as well, and guess what? My items always sell. The consignment shop I sold at had asked me if I wanted to stick with my price and not raise it. I’m sure I could try a game of roulette and raise my prices until no one buys anymore, but why do that when the price I have is already reasonable and brings in a few extra dollars in pocket cash?

My advice is to add up your products, do the tedious math on figuring out how much is used on one item, and raise it from there using your gut instinct. Don’t undersell yourself, but don’t oversell yourself either. Take your product to family and friends and ask them to honestly tell you what they’d feel comfortable paying for it. Use your own judgement on your work; you know that wonky, splotchy painting would never sell for $100, but maybe for $20 someone would buy it. That scarf has holes, dropped stitches and a few wrong color additions, it definitely isn’t worth $30, so maybe add it to a clearance special and sell it for $5.

It’s a bit of a struggle to get it right, but you’ll never know unless you just throw it out there for the world to decide.

Merry Christmas!

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WordPress Problems

1 Apr

Just letting you guys know, WordPress app is posting my posts in the wrong blogs. They should all be going to the nanojeno.wordpress.com blog, not 3dknits (which is my knitting blog) or bookmarks (which I should be deleting here as I have not used that in years).

I posted last night from a computer and that also posted it to the wrong blog, so there’s something awry with WP.

To clarify: nanojeno.wordpress.com is my main blog. Should this get posted elsewhere, and you are interested in following my further posts, please check out and add that one. .